Monday, February 3, 2020

Critical Thinking in Asking the Right Questions Research Paper - 1

Critical Thinking in Asking the Right Questions - Research Paper Example This is what will be attempted in the paper. The memo is written in response to the request made by director of operations regarding a leadership program for junior executives. The main issue discussed in the memo is the infeasibility of the proposed leadership program. The author argues that the proposed leadership program is not necessary because leaders are born and not made. Personal motivation of the direction of operations is questioned in the memo. The author concludes that a leadership program is not worth spending any money, and theories of leadership advocated by the director of operations are not in line with the culture of the company. Personal motivation behind the proposals is also highlighted in the conclusion. The reasons given in the memo for the infeasibility of the leadership program include selection issues, waste of money, ‘leaders are born not made’ view, leadership traits, and personal motivations of Miss Forsythe. Selection issues will be raised when many people will request for leadership training and this is something the company cannot afford, according to the memo. The leadership training will be a waste of money because the company has already fared well without such training in the past, and therefore the training is a waste of money. The philosophy of born leaders is used as a reason against leadership programs. The author argues that leaders are born and not made, and therefore leadership training will not help employees. Trait theory of leadership is used to dispel the idea of leadership training program in the memo. Another very important reason given against the leadership program is that the personal motivation of Miss Forsythe is to get the position of VP Human Resource. Ambiguity refers to the double meaning of words and phrases (Bach, 2012). There is ambiguity when the author talks about the company being prosperous

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Reviewing a Redundancy Decision

Reviewing a Redundancy Decision It is well established that when reviewing a redundancy decision the Authority  or Court will look at two factors. They are the genuineness of the redundancy and the  procedure by which it was carried out. The enquiry into each factor is carried out  separately (Coutts Cars Ltd v Baguley [2001] ERNZ 660 (CA)). Section 103A of the Employment Relations Act 2000 (the Act) requires an  employer must, before dismissing an employee, raise its concerns, allow the employee  an opportunity to respond and consider the response with an open mind  (ss.103A(3)(b) to (d)). That these requirements remain in the form of a consultation process in a  redundancy setting is confirmed by s.4(1A)(c) of the Act. The relationship was  confirmed by the Court in Jinkinson v Oceana Gold (NZ) Ltd [2010] NZEmpC 102. The Court recently affirmed in Rittson-Thomas t/a Totara Hills Farm v Davidson1 that it is not for the Court (or the Authority) to substitute its own view as to whether a position should be considered redundant (or not). Rather the inquiry should be in accordance with the statutory requirements, that is: whether what was done (the dismissal and the substantive reasons for it), and how it was done (the process undertaken), was what a fair and reasonable employer could have done in all the circumstances at the time of the dismissal.2 Section 103A Employment Relations Act 2000 Substantive Justification for dismissal is addressed in s.103A of the Employment Relations Act 2000 (the Act), which states: S103A Test of Justification i. For the purposes of section 103(1) (a) and (b), the question of whether a dismissal or an action was justifiable must be determined, on an objective basis, by applying the test in subsection (2). ii. The test is whether the employers actions, and how the employer acted, were what a fair and reasonable employer could have done in all the circumstances at the time the dismissal or action occurred. [63] The Test of Justification requires that the employer acted in a manner that was substantively and procedurally fair. An employer must establish that the dismissal was a decision that a fair and reasonable employer could have made in all the circumstances at the relevant time. [64] In the Employment Law case Michael Rittson-Thomas T/A Totara Hills Farm v Hamish Davidson1 Unrep [2013] NZEmpC 39 20 March 2013 (Rittson) his Honour Chief Judge Colgan considered that the Court cannot impose or substitute its business judgment for that of the employer taken at the time, however: [54] à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ the Court (or the Authority) must determine whether what was done and how it was done, were what a fair and reasonable employer would (now could) have done in all the circumstances at the time. So the standard is not the Courts (or the Authoritys) own assessment but rather, its assessment of what a fair and reasonable employer would/could have done and how. Those are separate and distinct standards. It is well established that when reviewing redundancy decisions the Authority or Court will look at two factors. They are the genuineness of the redundancy and the procedure by which it is carried out. The inquiry into each factor is carried out separately (Coutts Cars Ltd v. Bageley [2001] ERNZ 660 (CA)). - [27] Regarding the justifiability of a dismissal on grounds of redundancy, the starting point is to enquire whether the decision to make a position redundant was made for proper business purposes so as to ensure a purported redundancy is not an attempt to legitimize a dismissal where the predominate reason for termination of employment is for other reasons. [28] As with any allegation of unjustified dismissal, the onus is on the employer to demonstrate that its decision to terminate an employees employment was justified.3 Section 103A Employment Relations Act 2000 [29] In Rittson-Thomas [2013] NZEmpC 39 the Employment Court recently stated: It will be insufficient under s.103A, where an employer is challenged to justify dismissal or a disadvantage in employment, for the employer to say that this was a genuine business decision and the Court (or Authority) is not entitled to enquire into the merits of it.4 [60] The Court of Appeal statement of the law regarding the genuineness of a redundancy in GN Hale Son Ltd v Wellington Caretakers IUOW [1991] 1 NZLR 151 (Hale) was that: An employer is entitled to make his business more efficient, as for example by automation, abandonment of unprofitable activities, reorganisation or other cost-saving steps, no matter whether or not the business would otherwise go to the wall. A worker does not have a right to continued employment if the business can be run more efficiently without him. [61] However since Hale was decided, justification for dismissal is now as stated in the Employment Relations Act 2000 (the Act), which at s 103A of the Act sets out the Test of Justification as being: S103A Test of Justification i. For the purposes of section 103(1) (a) and (b), the question of whether a dismissal or an action was justifiable must be determined, on an objective basis, by applying the test in subsection (2). ii. The test is whether the employers actions, and how the employer acted, were what a fair and reasonable employer could have done in all the circumstances at the time the dismissal or action occurred. [62] The Test of Justification requires that the employer acted in a manner that was substantively and procedurally fair. An employer must establish that the dismissal was a decision that a fair and reasonable employer could have made in all the circumstances at the relevant time. [63] The Employment Court has issued recent decisions in this area which have reexamined the statement of the law in Hale in light of s 103A of the Act. [64] In Michael Rittson-Thomas T/A Totara Hills Farm v Hamish Davidson Unrep [2013] NZEmpC 39 20 March 2013 (Rittson) the Court referred to Hale and its previous comments about Hale in Simpsons Farms Limited v Aberhart [2006] ERNZ 825,842 . His Honour Chief Judge Colgan considered that the Court cannot impose or substitute its business judgment for that of the employer taken at the time, however: [54] à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ the Court (or the Authority) must determine whether what was done and how it was done, were what a fair and reasonable employer would (now could) have done in all the circumstances at the time. So the standard is not the Courts (or the Authoritys) own assessment but rather, its assessment of what a fair and reasonable employer would/could have done and how. Those are separate and distinct standards. [65] In that case, the Court was critical of the lack of information provided to the employee, and held that the employer had not adequately explained why the money saved by the disestablishment of the employees position justified the position being made redundant. The Court found upon analysis that the employer had been mistaken in concluding that there would be a wage saving of 10% per annum, when in fact it was 6%. This threw into doubt the genuineness of and, therefore, the justification for, the dismissal. [66] In Brake v Grace Team Accounting Limited [2013] NZEmpC 81 13 May 2013 (Brake) Travis J firmly endorsed Rittson, finding in that case that although the employer claimed that its financial position had deteriorated over the six months the employee had been employed requiring a reduction in salaries, in fact analysis by the Court concluded that the employers figures were incorrect and there had been no sudden deterioration. [67] On this basis it was held that the employers justification for the dismissal was mistaken, with the consequence that the dismissal of the employee was unjustified. [68] In Catherine Tan v Morningstar Institute of Education Ltd T/A Morningstar Preschool Ltd [2013] NZEmpC 82 16 May 2013 the Court adopted a similar approach. As in the case of the employee in Brake, Ms Tan had been provided with factually incorrect information about the employers financial position. She had been misled into thinking that the redundancy of her position was inevitable when it was not; the cost savings were relatively minor and insufficient to have satisfied the employers requirements. [26] In its submissions, Checkmate refers to a decision of the Authority BodePatterson v Hammond-Smith and Smith t/a I Love Merino Limited [2013] NZERA Auckland 294 ( Member Anderson ). In that decision, the Authority sets out an excellent summary of the law in respect to redundancy and for the purposes of the present decision, the analysis in Bode-Patterson is adopted without amendment. [27] For present purposes, it is enough to say that the law requires the Authority to enquire into the genuineness of a redundancy so as to ensure that the redundancy is being activated for proper business purposes and not being undertaken for base motives. [28] Further, it is important to note that it is not enough for a business owner to simply claim the necessity to make structural changes; they must be prepared to demonstrate that necessity to the satisfaction of the Authority. [29] In broad terms then, there are two enquiries that the Authority must make to satisfy itself about the genuineness of the redundancy. The first is to establish whether the evidence supports the employers contention that there were genuine business reasons for the redundancy and the second is to ensure that there is no base motive underpinning the decision to dismiss for redundancy such as, for instance, a conviction on the part of the employer that the business would be better off without the incumbent of the role to be made redundant. Attached as it were to that last consideration is an examination of whether there is evidence of mixed motives. [30] Dealing first with the underlying genuineness of the decision to declare redundancy, it is appropriate to remember Chief Judge Colgans observations in Michael Rittson-Thomas t/a Totara Hills Farm v Hamish Davidson [2013] NZEmpC 39 (Rittson-Thomas) wherein His Honour had this to say: It will be insufficient under s.103A, where an employer is challenged to justify a dismissal or disadvantage in employment, for the employer to say that this was a genuine business decision and the Court (or Authority) is not entitled to enquire into the merits of it. The Court (or Authority) will need to do so to determine whether the decision, and how it was reached, were what a fair and reasonable employer would/could have done in all the relevant circumstances. Procedure [67] An employer who is proposing to restructure its business or any part of its business must not only have genuine reasons for undertaking the restructuring, but must follow a fair procedure in respect of affected employees. [68] Provisions of the Act govern questions of justification for dismissal and, in particular, dismissal by reason of redundancy. Section 4 of the Act addresses the requirement for parties to the employment relationship to deal with each other in good faith. Section 4(1A)(c) in particular is relevant to a redundancy situation and requires an employer who is proposing to make a decision that will, or is likely to, have an adverse effect on the continuation of employment of an employee to provide to the employee affected: (i) access to information, relevant to the continuation of the employees employment, about the decision; and (ii) an opportunity to comment on the information to their employer before a decision is made. s4 (1A)(i) and (ii). [69] In a redundancy situation a fair and reasonable employer must, if challenged, be able to establish that he or she has complied with the statutory obligations of good faith dealing in s4 of the Act. His Honour Chief Judge Colgan in Simpsons Farms Limited v Aberhart2 [2006] ERNZ 825,842 noted that this compliance with good faith dealing includes consultation as the fair and reasonable employer will comply with the law Turning to process. Section 103A of the Employment Relations Act 2000 (the Act) requires an employer must, before dismissing an employee, raise its concerns, allow the employee an opportunity to respond and consider the response with an open mind (ss.103A(3)(b) to (d) of the Act). That these requirements, in the form of a consultation process, remain in the redundancy setting is expressly confirmed by s.4(1a)(c) of the Act and the relationship between the two sections is confirmed by the Court in Jinkinson v. Oceanagold (NZ) Ltd [2010] NZEmpC 102. The Court of Appeal in Aoraki Corp v McGavin [1998] 1 ERNZ 601 stated at page 619, the following proposition. What is crucial, however, is to recognise that the remedy can relate only to the particular wrong, to what has been lost or suffered as a result of the particular breach or failure. In this case the personal grievance is not that the employment was terminated, but that the manner of implementation of the decision to terminate was procedurally unfair. - Consultation In Simpsons Farms Limited v Aberhart6 Simpsons Farms Ltd and Aberhart [2006] ERNZ 825   the Chief Judge noted Consultation does not require agreement between the parties however genuine efforts must be made to reasonably accommodate the views of the employees and there should be a tendency to achieve consensus7 . - [37] Section s.4(1A)(c) of the Employment Relations Act places an obligation on an employer proposing to make a decision that may affect an employees ongoing employment, to provide to a potentially affected employee access to information relevant to its decision and an opportunity to comment on that information before making a final decision. [38] Further, where an employer is contemplating dismissal on grounds of redundancy, good faith requires an employer to consult with a potentially affected employee about the possibility of redundancy5 . Simpsons Farms Ltd and Aberhart [2006] ERNZ 825 [39] The requirements for an employer to provide information, and to act in good faith also assists the Authority in its assessment as to whether the employers decision was what a fair and reasonable employer could have done in all the circumstances. - Provide information [55] It is a truism that employers in a restructuring environment are obligated to provide affected staff with access to information, relevant to the continuation of the employees employment, about the decision; and à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ an opportunity to comment on the information to their employer before the decision is made: s.4(1A)(c) of the Act. [56] Those precepts were emphasised in a decision of the Full Bench of the Employment Court in Vice Chancellor of Massey University v. Martin Wrigley Ors [2011] NZEmpC 37 (Wrigley). [57] In para.[48] of the judgment, the Court says: When a business is restructured, the employer will, in most cases, have almost total power over the outcome. To the extent that affected employees may influence the employers final decision, they can do so only if they have knowledge and understanding of the relevant issues and a real opportunity to express their thoughts about those issues. In this sense, knowledge is the key to giving employees some measure of power to reduce the otherwise overwhelming inequality of power in favour of the employer. [58] And again at para.[55] of the judgment, the Court says: The purpose of s.4(1A)(c) is to be found in para.(ii) which requires the employer to give the employees an opportunity to comment before the decision is made. That opportunity must be real and not limited by the extent of the information made available by the employer. [emphasis added] Consultation [77] The law on consultation in a redundancy setting is well settled. An employer contemplating a restructure which affects an employee or employees must engage with those employees in good faith such that the employee has a straightforward opportunity to engage in the process, be aware of the issues driving the employer, and, amongst other things, suggest alternatives that the employer may not have thought of or may not have fully worked up. - Good faith [38] Even if a redundancy is decided upon for genuine business reasons if the justification for the redundancy is challenged by an employee the employer must be able to prove to the Authority that the decision made and how it was reached was what a fair and reasonable employer could have done in the circumstances that existed at the time3 Section 103A Employment Relations Act 2000.. In applying the tests under s.103A of the Employment Relations Act 2000 (the Act), Chief Judge Colgan of the Employment Court has recently explained that: [54] It will be insufficient under section 103A, where an employer is challenged to justify a dismissal or disadvantage in employment, for the employer simply to say that this was a genuine business decision and the Court (or the Authority) is not entitled to enquire into the merits of it. The Court (or the Authority) will need to do so to determine whether the decision, and how it was reached, were what a fair and reasonable employer would/could have done in all the relevant circumstances. 4 Michael Rittson-Thomas trading as Totara Hills Farm v Davidson [2013] NZEmpC 39 [39] Genuine consultation with an affected employee is required. Remedies Section 123(1)(a) to (c) of the Act provides as follows: (1) Where the Authority or the court determines that an employee has a personal grievance, it may, in settling the grievance, provide for any 1 or more of the following remedies: (a) reinstatement of the employee in the employees former position or the placement of the employee in a position no less advantageous to the employee: (b) the reimbursement to the employee of a sum equal to the whole or any part of the wages or other money lost by the employee as a result of the grievance: (c) the payment to the employee of compensation by the employees employer, including compensation for- (i) humiliation, loss of dignity, and injury to the feelings of the employee; and (ii) loss of any benefit, whether or not of a monetary kind, which the employee might reasonably have been expected to obtain if the personal grievance had not arisen. Contribution Section 124 of the Act, requires that where the Authority has determined that an employee has a personal grievance, the Authority must consider the extent to which the actions of the employee contributed towards the situation that gave rise to the personal grievance and remedies are to be withheld or reduced where there has been contribution or fault on the part of the employee. - Loss of rem Section 123(1)(b) provides that an employee dismissed unjustifiably may be reimbursed a sum equal to the whole or any part of the wages or other money lost by the employee as a result of the grievance. In Aoraki Corporation v McGavin9 the Court of Appeal held that in the absence of a contractual stipulation, the general practice as to the period of notice does not support fixing notice in excess of one month. If a redundancy is found to be genuine as I have in this matter, and a personal grievance for unjustified dismissal is upheld on grounds of procedural unfairness, remedies are confined to the distress caused by the way the redundancy was handled, rather than the loss of the job itself - Reimbursement of Lost Wages [52] Employees are under a duty to mitigate their loss and in this case there was insufficient evidence presented to the Authority to support the fact that Ms Whaanga had made a real effort to mitigate her loss. As Chief Judge Colgan made clear in Allen v Transpacific Industries Group Ltd (t/a Mediasmart Ltd) (2009) 6 NZELR 530, par 78: à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ dismissed employees are not only under an obligation to mitigate loss but to establish this in evidence if called upon. This will require, in practice, a detailed account of efforts made to obtain employment including dates, places, names, copies of correspondence and the like. [53] Ms Whaanga has not established evidence to support her efforts to mitigate her loss and in these circumstances I find that there is no compensation for lost wages is payable to her.

Saturday, January 18, 2020

Case Study question

The task that Eileen and Jack are doing on a separate level has set up what seems to be a personal relationship with each other. Jack uses Eileen more like an assistant or peer than one of the regular employees. Although Eileen is t the same level as the other workers she does different tasks as them. The interaction between Eileen and Jack is what is causing the rest of the team to have a negative sentiment towards Jacks leadership. They do not see Jack's behavior as appropriate or worthy Of their trust.If the two Of them continue to separate themselves from the rest of the team, it will cause the other workers to lower their work performance since they will feel unappreciated and that their work is not being noticed. Another problem that could arise is that they could report Jack to Human resources and accuse him of unfair retirement since Eileen is getting time off and preferential treatment. Applying Path-Goal and Attainment-Schmidt Continuum of leader behavior Jack needs underst and he is causing the resentment towards Eileen.He needs to develop every team member with the style that is best for them. Jack seems to be using an Achievement-oriented leadership style with Eileen, and wants the others to just be more like her. Believe Jack needs to be supportive in finding out why the other resent Eileen, by doing this he will discover that they feel he is giving preferential treatment to Eileen. Then he will be able to identify where his team is and change his leadership behavior according to the individual member.According to Attainment and Schmidt, Jack should be more democratic in his decisions. If he wants the group to work like a team then he should be less authoritarian and more democratic. This could limit the preferential treatment given to any employee in the group. Jack will be able to clarify the goals that need to be achieved and explain that Eileen is the best to stay late, or the team will be in agreement another team member would be better for th e task.

Friday, January 10, 2020

Choosing Good Creating an Outline for a Research Paper

Choosing Good Creating an Outline for a Research Paper The best sort of essay starts with the very best sort of topic, so take time to choose something which works for you. On the flip side, there isn't anything wrong with getting assistance from a very good consultant on the proper outline format. For a history paper on a particular time frame, you might decide to organize your paper around different facets of that period of time, like politics, social problems, or the use of women. You might also state what sort of approach it is you will use in your paper for the full discussion of your topic. New Ideas Into Creating an Outline for a Research Paper Never Before Revealed With a very good idea of the means by which the paper will go and the way to transition between your paragraphs or ideas, you are not going to stray from the home path and run into a corner. Should you need expert writing help, don't hesitate to visit EssayPro.com. When preparing a paper, there might be sev eral ideas you'd love to discuss or elaborate on but aren't sure of how to organize all of these. There are a couple tips on how to compose your abstract but the very best advice is that you look at some journals applicable to your research and attempt to format your abstract in a similar way. Who Else Wants to Learn About Creating an Outline for a Research Paper? Research proposals are extremely often underestimated. An individual should realize that every Research Paper is a sophisticated writing because it must contain distinctive research and distinctive idea. Writing a research paper is as critical as performing the true research or experiment itself and can seem to be an extremely daunting endeavor. Completing an MLA outline will make sure your research paper format is accurate. The magnitude of a research essay is impressive also. Basically, APA format is utilized in the social sciences. however, it isn't only limited to social sciences alone. You need to plan well to make a very good essay outline. Writing an outline is a rather effective method to think through how you'll organize and present the info in your essay. You also ought to go through the essay template to learn more on the subject of essay structure ones your outline is completed. Hearsay, Lies and Creating an Outline for a Research Paper Nobody will argue that It's quite challenging to compose an academic paper if there's no structure for it. An excellent way to begin is by producing a compelling and creative title. If you don't have a great template or outline structure, there are tons of good alternatives available all around the world wide web, so look there! Settle on which number format you want to use. Creating an Outline for a Research Paper - Dead or Alive? Writing an outline before proceeding to create a paper is genuinely an important stage for more or less any author. To begin, you will want a great topic and a strong focus so as to acquire your paper outline rolling. Yup, the very first tip is you ought ton't skip the practice of producing an outline. Still, it's best to begin with an outline, and you're ready to go. You might also see resume outline. You will locate an outline quite valuable. Besides a report outline and a presentation outline, a research paper outline is among the most frequent types of outlines you're very likely to encounter in any particular field. So, creation of an outline ought to be the next step after you've decided on your topic. You might also see speech outline. An outline is an overall plan of what it is you're likely to write you pare making an outline making an outline in an official outline, roman numerals may be used to. Here's What I Know About Creating an Outline for a Research Paper Even a cursory examination of the subject of academic writers will create various websites. The introduction describes the primary purpose of the writing. An outline aids in keeping track of all of the information, thus making the total job of writing the academic paper simpler. Creating an Outline for a Research Paper Features Should you do the research paper outline well, you'll have done the majority of the work and the following step will be so much simpler! When you've concluded your paper and are prepared for publication, it is also possible to use an outline to help you in making a table of contents for your paper. Every paper will differ, and the organization will be contingent on the subject you're writing about. It's especially useful when it regards a huge research paper of some type of academic essay that's big enough in dimension. Basic and a strategy to compose a research paper will gain from your paper. Thinking through your ideas and getting them organized on paper before you get started writing will make the entire process simpler for you and also help to make your paper clear and simple to read. Outlines are usually necessary for approval prior to you proceed to your present paper but in instances exactly where it isn't, it nonetheless is worth it to make an outline to ensure your present paper is each complete and coherent. If you intend to write for a particular journal, an excellent advice is to look at the research paper outline of a few of the articles to have a better idea on the best way to compose your article. Things You Should Know About Creating an Outline for a Research Paper After reading the thesis, there ought to be no doubt precisely what the research will be about. A capstone project, which is also referred to as a culmination undertaking, is utilised to demonstrate your abilities a nd what you've learned from studying. There are various styles so that your instructor can supply the essential information about what to utilize for your undertaking.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Electron Capture Definition

Electron capture is a type of radioactive decay where the nucleus of an atom absorbs a K or L shell electron and converts a proton into a neutron. This process reduces the atomic number by 1 and emits gamma radiation or an x-ray and a neutrino.The decay scheme for electron capture is:ZXA e- → ZYA-1 ÃŽ ½ ÃŽ ³whereZ is the atomic massA is atomic numberX is the parent elementY is daughter elemente- is an electronÃŽ ½ is a neutrinoÃŽ ³ is a gamma photon Also Known As: EC, K-capture (if K shell electron is captured), L-capture (if L shell electron is captured) Example Nitrogen-13 decays to Carbon-13 by electron capture.13N7 e- → 13C6 ÃŽ ½ ÃŽ ³ History Gian-Carlo Wick proposed the theory of electron capture in 1934. Luis Alvarez was the first to observe K-electron capture in the isotope vanadium-48. Alvarez reported his observation in Physical Review in 1937.

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Eating Disorders and the Media Essay - 1287 Words

Eating Disorders and the Media American writer Allen Ginsberg once said: Whoever controls the media-the images-controls the culture. Nothing could be truer, the media has always influenced fashion and body shape. But whats remarkable now is how much the media affects body image, and how willing and eager people are to mess with Mother Nature. (Underwood, par.2) Although there are other factors that contribute to eating disorders the media can partially be blamed for the millions of people with eating disorders because it promotes and glamorizes being thin to the public. A healthy newborn child eats when it is hungry and stops when it is full. But there are factors that combat against a normal relationship with food from the†¦show more content†¦In most television ads, thin and flawless models grace the screen to sell products. These ads portray woman who have a weight that is way below average, and unhealthy. It is impossible to attain this look, and the women watching these ads at home dont realize that. Ads like these are shown during shows that teenage girls watch, and this is the age when women are most vulnerable to develop an eating disorder. The more that a person is exposed to these ads, the greater their desire to be thin is. According to Eating Disorders Awareness and Prevention Incorporated a study of 4,294 networked television commercials revealed that one out of every 3.8 commercials send some sort of attractive message, telling viewers what is or is not attractive. These researchers estimate the average person sees over 5,260 attractiveness messages per year, and that is only from television advertisements. (The Media, par.3) Women resort to eating disorders because it is the only way to achieve their goal of looking like the women in the television advertisements. Womens magazines routinely show two sides of the same story; a gooey, fattening cake recipe placed next to an advertisement for Slim Fast or diet tips from the television stars across the page from an articl e on bulimia. This type of advertising in magazines sends very mixed signals toShow MoreRelatedEating Disorders And The Media799 Words   |  4 Pages Eating Disorders and Their Relationship to Images in the Media: Anorexia and Bulimia People around the world are suffering from different eating disorders. Some people simply can’t stop eating which causes overweight. Others, controversially, don’t eat at all causing themselves to end up with hardly treatable eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. Such eating disorders are mainly caused by the mass media including advertisements, magazines television and internet. In today s existenceRead MoreMedia Eating Disorders1607 Words   |  7 Pagesreview is to describe the main causes of eating disorders among teenagers aged 12 to 18 years old in high schools globally, and to also explain to what extend do some of these causes influence eating disoders. Recent studies have indicated a major increase in the eating disorder habits and body dissatisfaction in adolescence over the past few decades. This crisis seems most prevalent in females`` than males with 20 percent high school females exhibiting poor eating habits and about 60 percent undergoneRead Mo reEating Disorders and the Media941 Words   |  4 PagesAccording to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, â€Å"the body type portrayed in advertising as the ideals is possessed naturally by only 5% of American females.† (â€Å"ANAD†) Body image has been a controversial theme because of the influence of the media. It is a widely known fact that eating disorder cases are on the rise. The concept of body image is a subjective matter. The common phrase, â€Å"Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder,† holds true meaning in this sense. One’sRead MoreEating Disorders And The Media3374 Words   |  14 PagesEating Disorders and the Media Eating disorders have become a major problem throughout the world, specifically in the United States. The key factor that has an influence on eating disorders is the media. Including people of all ages and genders, up to twenty-four million people suffer from an eating disorder in the United States (ANAD np). This is a huge problem in the world today but what makes it so much worse is the fact that it can be prevented and it is in our control to change it. Young adultsRead MoreMedia Is The Blame For Eating Disorders844 Words   |  4 Pagesfacebook, snapchat. Today’s media has dominated the way young women see themselves. Young women are constantly comparing themselves to Kendall Jenner, Kim Kardashian, or even their best friend. b. Relevance statement: i. Many people can relate to media being the blame for eating disorders because they’ve either dealt with this or know someone who has had an eating disorder due to what the media says you should look like. c. Thesis statement: i. When thinking of how the media can manipulate your ideaRead MoreThe Effects Of Media On Eating Disorders1034 Words   |  5 Pagesmeal will be. This being said, an estimated 70 million people worldwide suffer from some sort of eating disorders as of 2015 with 30 million being made up of Americans. Eating Disorders can be defined as any eating habit that negatively affects ones overall health. Media has had a large impact on how both males and females see their bodies. A majority of the people who suffer from eating disorders are young adults and teenagers. This can be linked to the pressure put on them to have what societyRead MoreEssay on Eating Disorders and the Media2815 Words   |  12 PagesEating Disorders and the Media Question: How does the media alter the perceptions of adolescents body image? How does this exposure to the ideal body lead adolescents to develop eating disorders? Hypothesis: Media exposure creates an ideal body image that is not easily maintained by most adolescents and causes adolescents to be dissatisfied with their bodies and leads to unhealthy diet habits and other more sever eating disorders. Logic of Study: What if the media was limitedRead MoreMedias Influence On Eating Disorders1767 Words   |  8 Pages â€Å"Dying to be Perfect†: Medias’ Influence on Eating Disorders Poet Allen Ginsberg once said that â€Å"whoever controls the media-the images-controls the culture†, and nothing could be truer than this. Media plays a larger role in society within this generation more than many of us are aware of. It can easily impact people’s lives through aspects such as sports, fashion, movies or hobbies, but unfortunately, one of these impacts is how we view our body. Media constantly posts images and messagesRead MoreEssay on Eating Disorders and the Media6828 Words   |  28 PagesEating Disorders and the Media Doctors annually diagnose millions of Americans with eating disorders. Of those diagnosed, ninety percent are women. Most of these women have one of the two most common types of eating disorders: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa (National Council on Eating Disorders, 2004). People with anorexia nervosa experience heart muscle shrinkage along with slow and irregular heartbeats and eventually heart failure. Along with their heart, their kidney, digestiveRead MoreThe Media Is Responsible For The Increase Of Eating Disorders1452 Words   |  6 Pagesdemonstrate different viewpoints on how the media plays a role in today’s era. My research will study the influence of media on eating behaviors and the significant studies regarding this topic. My paper will also cover the outcomes of media portraying unhealthy body images, weight loss ads, and the influence of the internet encouraging eating disorders. Based on the research, it can be clear that the media is responsible for the increase of eating disorders in today’s society. Therefore, it is important

Monday, December 16, 2019

The Color Purple Free Essays

Thesis: â€Å"The Color Purple† is more than just entertainment because the story shows what poverty in the old days was like, especially among the colored people and the hardship way of life created from the White man. This novel is dealing with real life situations that no one would talk about. Alice Walker’s prize winning novel â€Å"The Color Purple,† turned into motion picture in 1985. We will write a custom essay sample on The Color Purple or any similar topic only for you Order Now In the beginning, the film caused a wide range of controversy. People who wrote hate letters and organization’s who threatened to boycott the whole production. The Black women’s story was told to millions of people by Hollywood. Another explanation for the movie was how many black people were illiterate, and some did not go to school. The movie influences the audience by showing how what can happen behind closed doors and expresses how that color is the same no matter what the color may be. The film also shows how men over powered women. In a movie-based novel there is always question of becoming a Hollywood movie. Hollywood is notoriously insensitive to the concerns of women and people of color. Years after the release of the movie â€Å"The Color Purple,† Alice Walker expressed her opinion on the movie in the book â€Å"The same river twice† published in 1996. The book includes a draft of Alice Walker’s original screenplay, and some aspects and thoughts on the making and the reception of the film, which became the original story of â€Å"The Color Purple. † How to cite The Color Purple, Essay examples